7 Result(s)

Crimson Startup

Do you want to change the world and benefit society and the economy by turning university technology into a successful business enterprise? Learn how and get started! Be a part of a course that was created at Stanford University, has made its way to universities across the nation including Berkeley, Princeton and Georgia Tech, and is now offered at UA. Crimson Startup is a 6 week experiential program where you participate on a team to explore entrepreneurship firsthand. You and your team will talk to potential customers, partners, and other stakeholders to search for and find a repeatable and scalable business model. You and your team will present each week what you learned and receive feedback from other teams and be guided by coache...

Required Availability
Summer 2017
Course Credit?
No
Paid Position?
No

Numerical solutions of variable exponent differential equations

Student will be creating numerical solutions of certain differential equations that generalize the classical models of a body falling under the influence of gravity and experiencing air resistance. The goal of these models is to help identify which kinds of differential equations have bounded solutions: for instance, do the solutions approach a constant value (e.g. a terminal velocity) as time increases?...

Required Availability
Fall 2017 | Spring 2018
Course Credit?
No
Paid Position?
No
Preferred Majors
Applied Mathematics | Mathematics

various aspects of knot theory

Knot theory is an active research area with applications in mathematics, and in many branches of sciences. The goal for interested student will be learning some aspects of this theory and its applications. ...

Required Availability
Summer 2017
Course Credit?
No
Paid Position?
No
Preferred Majors
Mathematics
Faculty
Bulent Tosun

Computational peptide chemistry

Advanced computational electronic structure methods will be used to calculate the geometries, vibrational frequencies, energetics, and excited state properties of important compounds of biological interest. Both correlated molecular orbital theory and density functional theory will be used. The focus of the work is on charging of peptides for explaining mass spectrometry results for both cationic and anionic peptides. The cationic work will focus on transition metal ion charging. Both types of studies are relevant to the study of the Human proteome....

Required Availability
Fall 2017 | Spring 2018
Course Credit?
Yes - CH396:398
Paid Position?
No

computational catalysis

The control of chemical transformation via catalysis is both an exceptional intellectual challenge and critically important to the Nation. Catalysis is central to energy production and utilization, to chemical manufacturing, to the minimization of environmental impact, and it has been arguably the single most important agent for sustainable development in the developing world. The revolutions in nanotechnology and high performance computing provide unprecedented new opportunities to elucidate the fundamental principles governing the control of chemical transformation by catalysts. Indeed, the coupling of theory, modeling and simulation with experiment will provide the most profound insights into catalyst behavior and thus enable the design ...

Required Availability
Fall 2017 | Spring 2018
Course Credit?
Yes - CH396:398
Paid Position?
No

Development and Application of Techniques for the Experimental Detection of Dark Matter

Faculty and students in the Department of Physics and Astronomy are collaborating on the LZ dark matter search experiment to test the hypothesis that dark matter, comprising more than 85% of the total mass of the universe, is comprised of weakly interacting massive particles. The main contributions of the UA group to this effort are in the areas of carrying out sensitive radio-assays to select materials which are low in radioactivity, calibrating the response of the LZ detector to WIMP interactions, and developing algorithms based on the raw detector signals to discriminate between WIMP interactions and backgrounds. There are opportunities for undergraduates to build and evaluate prototypes, operate sensitive particle detectors and analy...

Required Availability
Summer 2018 | Fall 2017 | Spring 2018
Course Credit?
Yes - PH490
Paid Position?
No

Computaitonal heavy element chemsitry

We are interested in developing a fundamental and predictive understanding of actinide chemistry in aqueous solution under conditions relevant to nuclear-waste storage and reprocessing of spent fuel to address aggregate and colloid formation. Intractable, small aggregates in nuclear-waste streams can impair clean-up, forcing a low-level waste stream to be treated as high-level waste, thereby increasing treatment costs. Metal oligomers, aggregates, clusters, nanophases and colloids are ubiquitous in aqueous chemistry. Thought to form via the condensation reactions of hydrolyzed metal ions, intrinsic dissolved aggregates or colloids are generally described as poly-dispersed hydroxides or hydrous oxides with varying stoichiometry and no well-d...

Required Availability
Fall 2017 | Spring 2018
Course Credit?
Yes - CH396:398
Paid Position?
No