9 Result(s)

Optimizing extrusion parameters for stretchable fibers and wearable sensors

The Koh Lab has recently completed a custom-built mini extruder for making thermoplastic elastomer fibers. With this extruder, we can make stretchable fibers either as 3D printing substrates or as dielectric materials for wearable pressure sensors. In order to optimize the fibers we will explore various metal and ceramic fillers and loadings. The student part of this project will not only optimize the parameters needed to optimally extrude fibers with varying thicknesses but will also learn to characterize the mechanical and electrical properties of the fibers and thermoplastic materials independently as well as, ideally, in a stretchable device....

Required Availability
Fall 2022
Course Credit?
Yes - CHE498
Paid Position?
No

Developing capacitive pressure sensors for the capture of breath information via voice and instrument

The Koh Lab has a significant depth of experience creating novel dielectric materials for capacitive pressure sensors. So far, our work has focused on high loads such as those you may expect under the foot from walking. In this project, we look to expand our usage of capacitive pressure sensors to capture information about breath in two unique ways. First, we will put capacitive pressure sensors in instruments to record pressure changes from the vibrations caused by breathing. Second, we will develop pressure sensors to be worn on the torso to quantify breathing patterns of vocal students in order to better quantify the methods needed to properly control breath with the long term goal of developing training programs for at home therapy ...

Required Availability
Fall 2022
Course Credit?
Yes - CHE498
Paid Position?
No

biomedical and environmental sensors

Dr. Cheng is looking for motivated undergraduate students to join his group. The students will participate in several projects funded by NSF, GLPF and UA. As an example, his group is developing new implantable material, sensors and machine learning algorithms in order to remotely monitor people with disabilities. The students should be familiar with engineering principles, programming and problem solving....

Required Availability
The End of Time
Course Credit?
No
Paid Position?
Yes - $10/hr

Evaluating Novel Surfactants for High Internal Phase Emulsion Polymer Foams as Water Treatment Technology

The Koh Lab is currently working on developing new surfactants with a variety of different structures to create high internal phase emulsion polymer foams (pHIPE). With this library of surfactants we need to characterizing interfacial tension and then utilize the highest performing surfactant to create adsorbent foams. This project will involve the fundamental characterization of the surfactants, with the additional project of building a suitable enclosure for the instrument, as well as the creation of pHIPE. Final aspects of this project will be the validation of adsorbency of the pHIPE using simple contaminants....

Required Availability
Fall 2022
Course Credit?
Yes - CHE498
Paid Position?
No
Preferred Majors
Chemistry | Chemical Engineering
Faculty
Amanda Koh

computational catalysis

The control of chemical transformation via catalysis is both an exceptional intellectual challenge and critically important to the Nation. Catalysis is central to energy production and utilization, to chemical manufacturing, to the minimization of environmental impact, and it has been arguably the single most important agent for sustainable development in the developing world. The revolutions in nanotechnology and high performance computing provide unprecedented new opportunities to elucidate the fundamental principles governing the control of chemical transformation by catalysts. Indeed, the coupling of theory, modeling and simulation with experiment will provide the most profound insights into catalyst behavior and thus enable the design ...

Required Availability
The End of Time
Course Credit?
Yes - CH396:398
Paid Position?
No

Bioinorganic chemistry of chromium/new drugs for diabetes

Elucidation of the structure, function, and mode of action of metallobiomolecules.The elucidation of the structure, function, and mode of action of metallobiomolecules via: 1) spectroscopic, magnetic, kinetic and biochemical studies of the natural systems and 2) the synthesis and characterization of biomimetic inorganic complexes. Our research applies biochemical and synthetic and physical inorganic methods to characterize the function and properties of metallobiomolecules (naturally occurring molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, sugars, etc. that contain tightly bound metal ions). The presence of the metal ions gives these species unique magnetic and spectroscopic properties (such as color) that provide avenues (not available to t...

Required Availability
The End of Time
Course Credit?
Yes - CH 396/CH 497
Paid Position?
No

Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology

The Summers research lab is always looking for motivated undergraduate students who are interested in performing research at the interface of engineering, microbiology, and biochemistry. Students will work on one of several projects related to genetic engineering of bacteria and yeast, including: (1) Elucidation of how bacteria recognize and respond to caffeine in their environment (2) Development of tools to engineer bacteria and yeast (3) Engineering bacteria to create high-value chemicals (4) Engineering yeast cells to produce high-value chemicals Students should expect to spend 6-10 hours per week in the lab. A commitment of at least one academic year is requested, but ideally students will continue to perform research in the l...

Required Availability
The End of Time
Course Credit?
Yes - CHE 491/498
Paid Position?
No

Computational peptide chemistry

Advanced computational electronic structure methods will be used to calculate the geometries, vibrational frequencies, energetics, and excited state properties of important compounds of biological interest. Both correlated molecular orbital theory and density functional theory will be used. The focus of the work is on charging of peptides for explaining mass spectrometry results for both cationic and anionic peptides. The cationic work will focus on transition metal ion charging. Both types of studies are relevant to the study of the Human proteome....

Required Availability
The End of Time
Course Credit?
Yes - CH396:398
Paid Position?
No

Computational heavy element chemsitry

We are interested in developing a fundamental and predictive understanding of actinide chemistry in aqueous solution under conditions relevant to nuclear-waste storage and reprocessing of spent fuel to address aggregate and colloid formation. Intractable, small aggregates in nuclear-waste streams can impair clean-up, forcing a low-level waste stream to be treated as high-level waste, thereby increasing treatment costs. Metal oligomers, aggregates, clusters, nanophases and colloids are ubiquitous in aqueous chemistry. Thought to form via the condensation reactions of hydrolyzed metal ions, intrinsic dissolved aggregates or colloids are generally described as poly-dispersed hydroxides or hydrous oxides with varying stoichiometry and no well-d...

Required Availability
The End of Time
Course Credit?
Yes - CH396:398
Paid Position?
No